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Are you an Anglican interested in the Roman Catholic Church?

If you are an Anglican interested in becoming part of the Roman Catholic Church, I direct you first to the webstie of the pastoral provision of 1980. This provision allows for preserving, in the Catholic communion, the rites and ceremonies according to the Book of Common Prayer. If you do not live in an area where an Anglican-Use Catholic church may be found, please contact your local Catholic church and begin speaking with its pastor about entering into communion with Rome. The pastor will have it in his authority to celebrate mass according to the Anglican-Use, if he so chooses, and you may direct him to the above link and to the online text of the Holy Mass according to the Book of Divine Worship, which is an adapted form of the 1928 Book of Common Prayer. If you are interested in general questions of unity between Anglicans and Catholics, please read this. Here is a history of the Anglican Use and its establishment as well as the document of the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith which established it.

If you have any further questions, or if you are a Catholic further interested in this Use of the Latin Rite in English, please email me.

This Use is permissible to be used by any and all Roman Catholics. And to show the beauty of it, and why more Catholic parishes should consider it as a liturgical option, I ask you to read the Roman Canon according to the Anglican Use below:

MOST MERCIFUL FATHER, we humbly pray thee, through Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord, and we ask, that thou accept and + bless these gifts, these presents, these holy and unspoiled sacrifices.

We offer them unto thee, first, for thy holy Catholic Church: that thou vouchsafe to keep it in peace, to guard, unite, and govern it throughout the whole world; together with thy servant N. our Pope, and N. our Bishop, and all the faithful guardians of the Catholic and Apostolic faith.

Remember, O Lord, thy servants and handmaids (N. and N.) and all who here around us stand, whose faith is known unto thee and their steadfastness manifest, on whose behalf we offer unto thee: or who themselves offer unto thee this sacrifice of praise, for themselves, and for all who are theirs: for the redemption of their souls, for the hope of their salvation and safety: and who offer their prayers unto thee, the eternal God, the living and true.

United in one communion, we venerate the memory, first, of the glorious ever-Virgin Mary, Mother of our God and Lord Jesus Christ, of Joseph her spouse; as also of thy blessed Apostles and Martyrs, Peter and Paul, Andrew, (James, John, Thomas, James, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Simon and Thaddaeus: Linus, Cletus, Clement, Xystys, Cornelius, Cyprian, Lawrence, Chrysogonus, John and Paul, Cosmas and Damian) and of all thy
Saints; grant that by their merits and prayers we may in all things be defended with the help of thy protection.

We beseech thee then, O Lord, graciously to accept this oblation from us thy servants, and from thy whole family: order thou our days in thy peace, and bid us to be delivered from eternal damnation, and to be numbered in the fold of thine elect.

Vouchsafe, O God, we beseech thee, in all things to make this oblation blessed, approved and accepted, a perfect and worthy offering: that it may become for us the body and blood of thy dearly beloved Son, our Lord Jesus Christ.

Who, the day before he suffered, took bread into his holy and venerable hands, and with eyes lifted up to heaven unto thee, God, his almighty Father, giving thanks to thee, he blessed, broke, and gave it to his disciples, saying:

"TAKE THIS, ALL OF YOU, AND EAT IT:
THIS IS MY BODY
WHICH WILL BE GIVEN UP FOR YOU"
Likewise, after supper, taking also this goodly chalice into his holy and venerable hands, again giving thanks to thee, he blessed, and gave it to his disciples saying:
"TAKE THIS , ALL OF YOU, AND DRINK FROM IT:
THIS IS THE CUP OF MY BLOOD,
THE BLOOD OF THE NEW AND EVERLASTING COVENANT.
IT WILL BE SHED FOR YOU AND FOR ALL
SO THAT SINS MAY BE FORGIVEN.
DO THIS IN MEMORY OF ME."

The Celebrant says, Therefore we proclaim the mystery of faith:

And the people respond:

Christ has died. Christ is risen. Christ will come again.

The Celebrant continues,

Wherefore, O Lord, we thy servants, and thy holy people also,
remembering the blessed passion of the same Christ thy Son our Lord, as also his resurrection from the dead, and his glorious ascension into heaven: do offer unto thine excellent majesty of thine own gifts and bounty, the pure Victim, the Holy Victim, the immaculate Victim, the holy Bread of eternal life, and the Chalice of everlasting salvation.

Vouchsafe to look upon them with a merciful and pleasant countenance: and to accept them, even as thou didst vouchsafe to accept the gifts of thy servant Abel the Righteous, and the sacrifice of our Patriarch Abraham: and the holy sacrifice, the immaculate victim, which thy high priest Melchisedech offered unto thee.

We humbly beseech thee, almighty God: command these offerings to be brought by the hands of thy holy Angel to thine altar on high, in sight of thy divine majesty: that all we who at this partaking of the altar shall receive the most sacred Body and Blood of thy Son, + may be fulfilled with all heavenly benediction and grace.

Remember also, O Lord, thy servants and handmaids (N. and N.), who have gone before us sealed with the seal of faith, and who sleep the sleep of peace. To them, O Lord, and to all that rest in Christ, we beseech thee to grant the abode of refreshing, of light, and of peace.

To us sinners also, thy servants, who hope in the multitude of thy
mercies, vouchsafe to grant some part and fellowship with thy holy Apostles and Martyrs: with John, Stephen, Matthias, Barnabas, (Ignatius, Alexander, Marcellinus, Peter, Felicitas, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucy, Agnes, Cecelia, Anastasia), and with all thy Saints: within whose fellowship we beseech thee, admit us, not weighing our merit, but granting us forgiveness; through Jesus Christ our Lord;

Through whom, O Lord, thou dost ever create all these good things; dost sanctify, quicken, bless, and bestow them upon us.

By whom, and with whom, and in whom, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, all honor and glory be unto thee, O Father Almighty, world without end.

The people respond, Amen.
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Biblical Criticism: the Right Perspective

In recent years, there has been a lot of argument and discussion about modern biblical criticism. In 1988 Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith attacked historical criticism on a fundamental level.[1] The Pontifical Biblical Commission in 1993 issued its document “The Interpretation of the Bible in the Church” and remained, despite the Cardinal’s criticisms of the historical-critical method, rather middle-of-the-road; the commission has been seen by some conservatives as too permissive and too ready to accept the deliverances of the form critics. The critics have defended themselves with vigor against anyone who dares to challenge their supremacy; Fr. William Most and Msgr. George Kelly are two examples. Whatever else may be said, no one is happy about the situation. There is a good deal of confusion and name-calling, and not a lot of solid work. Unfortunately, I cannot change all that with one opinion piece. Instead, what I propose to do here is to offer, briefly, a way out of the endless circle of debate. This way out is of no use to scholars or exegetes, and it is for them more of a cautioning than anything else. This essay is intended for ordinary priests and laymen who are tired of the endless fighting and are sick of taking sides: “Are you a conservative?” “Well, are you a liberal?” We are reminded of St. Paul’s words about the church at Corinth (1 Corinthians 1:12): “…Each of you is saying, ‘I belong to Paul,’ or ‘I belong to Apollos,’ or ‘I belong to Kephas,’ or ‘I belong to Christ.’” Things have not gone quite that far, but if they are not stopped, they may very well. To my mind, they need not go any further.

My way out is very simple; it is so simple, in fact, that I have a hard time saying more than two words about it. It is a matter of perspective. These men—be they liberals, conservatives, feminists, or schismatics—are just literary critics. The point is easily missed. Let me say it again: the modern biblical critics are just literary critics. They are not physicists, and they are not saints. Biblical criticism is a subdivision of that dubious discipline called “literary criticism”.

In order to illustrate this point, I ask you to consider the following: If you have just read Hamlet and you come across the critic Harold Bloom’s recent book on it, how much weight will you give to what Bloom has to say? Will you consider what he says to be indisputable truth? Probably not. You may or may not agree with his theories, but you will not regard them as anything more than literary criticisms of a great play. Harold Bloom may well be the man most qualified to give the right interpretation of the play; he certainly has the linguistic, historical, cultural, textual, and literary knowledge for it. Nevertheless, I myself—and probably most readers—would have no problem disagreeing with him, despite the fact that we are not the expert he is. Indeed, Harold Bloom and I seem to agree on very nearly nothing.

This is an interesting fact, and we must ask why it should be so. The answer is easy enough: having all of the knowledge in the world does not mean a man will judge rightly. A great myth of our times is that having expertise is like belonging to a secret society which has the answers to all the questions; this explains why people often ask doctors questions that have nothing to do with medicine; they are experts, after all, so they must know. The fact of the matter is that these experts very often say things more crazy than the lady in the pew ever dreamed, and they may rightly suffer her wrath when they tell her that her Lord did not rise from the dead. Again, the heart of the matter is judgment. And judgment is a gift of God. With Mark Twain, we may say that God must have loved ordinary people because He sure made a lot of them. While it is doubtful that God distributed good judgment more liberally among ordinary people than He did among critics, there is no reason whatever to believe that He distributed it more liberally among biblical literary critics than He did among the rest of the world. Given that we don’t generally put much stock in what the ordinary critics have to say, we are forced to wonder why we have put so much stock in what biblical literary critics have to say. It cannot be because of their extensive knowledge of the books and of the period. Harold Bloom has the same, or better, knowledge of his particular books and his particular period. And yet we don’t have much problem disagreeing with him. We could go back over the list above, but the point, I take it, is clear. The only thing that separates biblical literary critics from ordinary literary critics is just that they are biblical, that they are studying the Bible. Now, of course, the Bible is the inerrant, inspired word of Almighty God, and its study is far more important than the study of Much Ado about Nothing. But that fact alone shouldn’t give us more confidence in these biblical literary critics; if anything it should give us less. We should trust them less precisely because the subject is so much more important. If we are led astray by Harold Bloom about Hamlet, we have lost something. If we are led astray by John Dominic Crossan about Jesus, we may well lose everything.

And that is the right perspective.

There are at least three provisos that must be made. First, I am not condemning scholarship. Scholars are necessary, though they are the means to an end, not the end itself, as they so often think. It is important that scholarly work be done on these very topics, and it is important that some of those scholars have a degree of freedom to speak their mind without fear of the Church. (It is more important, however, that seminarians should be well trained, and if we have to choose, then we should prefer faithful priests to free professors.) The scholars themselves, however, should remember that they are parts of the Body of Christ; they are not its head; they cannot dictate theology; and they must recognize their subordinate position. No saint was ever a saint just because he was a great scholar; some saints have been great scholars, but the first comes before the second and is independent of it.

Second, a distinction must be made between literary criticism and textual criticism, papyrology, and philology. Physics is the king of the so-called “hard” sciences. After it in rigor, results, and detail, is chemistry. Biology follows them both. Astronomy is in there somewhere. Near the bottom of the list we find textual criticism, papyrology, and philology. These three make the list. What we do not, nor ever will, find on that list is literary criticism. Textual criticism is a science. So are papyrology and other similar disciplines. Literary criticism is not. It may seem difficult to distinguish among them. It only seems so. The difference almost invariably lies in this: papyrology does not tell you what a text means, it only tells you what the text is. Papyrology, textual criticism, and philology provide the basis for forming our beliefs about what the text means, for before we can know what something means we have to know what it is. These disciplines, and their sister disciplines, from paleography to the chemical analysis of inks and parchments, must be taken seriously and fostered. Here, the Church must intervene only for very real and very serious reasons. (For example, it would have been wrong if the Church had suppressed the discovery that The Donation of Constantine was a fraud.)

Third, the views and theories of biblical literary critics must be given their due weight. On most questions, that weight will not be very much, or, rather, it will be as much weight as we give to any other literary critic. Nevertheless, those competent authorities must see to it that the literary critical endeavor continues. The faithful do require exegesis, and difficult problems do arise that must be handled. Largely, the academic questions should remain in the academy, and local ordinaries should have the authority to see that they do so. It is not unwise to remember the way of the Church Fathers. If we read the Catena Aurea, we will see that a good many fathers disagreed with one another about a good many things. It is not that they did not take matters seriously; they had their share of arguments in their own day, say, for example, between the Antiochene and Alexandrian schools of exegesis. What they did not do was imagine that their own peculiar interpretation carried some special “scholarly” status, which is apparently akin to the revelation itself, if not outright superior to it. (I should almost pray that one of these modern scholars goes to sleep one night and is given the grace to dream Ezekiel’s dream for himself; then perhaps he would be more cautious in tearing it apart.) If we may further remark—the Church Fathers were more honest about each other and themselves than we are: if St. Jerome thought a man was a fool, he would simply say so and be done with it; we are too sophisticated to say what we believe and too fool to understand that we have “sophisticated” our way into grave sin; St. Jerome bewailed his own manifold sins and wickedness because he knew them well; we call ourselves sinners, not because we believe we are wicked, but because we would have men believe we are saints; in short, we are Pharisees, and the Church Fathers were saints. Honesty, not academic freedom, is paramount, for freedom is worthless without truth.

On a final note, there is a certain paradox regarding the scholarly study of scripture. The paradox is this: the scholars who study the scriptures can only use the tools that other scholars use to study other works of literature; but the scriptures are far more than any other work of literature ever could be. The scriptures, by their nature, do not only demand that they should be reverenced, they also demand that they be interpreted. We should trust biblical literary critics less than we trust ordinary literary critics because the subject matter is so much more important; but just because the scriptures are so much more important, they cry out for interpretation in a way that no other work does. And these two antipathies are what should run throughout any critical work on the scriptures. As Augustus Caesar once said, “Festina Lente.” Make haste slowly. So too here. If a biblical literary critic were to read this opinion, I should have only one thing to say directly to him: Interpret cautiously with great zeal. Or, as the Lord of Sabaoth said to His servant Moses, “Put off your shoes from your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.” Interpret cautiously with great zeal.



[1] January 27, 1988, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, in the Erasmus lecture sponsored by the Rockford Institute Center on Religion & Society, “Biblical Interpretation in Crisis: On the Question of the Foundations and Approaches of Exegesis Today”


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Prayer for Unity

Please add the following prayer to the Prayers of the Faithful at your church (this, or something like it):

Lord Jesus Christ, You prayed at the Last Supper and in the Garden, that Your disciples would be one in You as You are in the Father: bring about now the reunion of the Catholic, Orthodox, and Anglican churches, that they may be one again. For this we pray to the Lord:
Lord, hear our prayer.
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The Litany

As another illustration of the beauty of the Anglican-Use, here follows the Litany from the Book of Divine Worship, beginning pg. 189:

The Litany

or General Supplication

¶ To be used after the Third Collect at Morning or Evening Prayer; or before the Holy Communion; or separately.

O GOD the Father, Creator of heaven and earth;
Have mercy upon us.
O God the Son, Redeemer of the world;
Have mercy upon us.
O God the Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful;
Have mercy upon us.
O holy, blessed, and glorious Trinity, one God;
Have mercy upon us.

REMEMBER not, Lord, our offences, nor the offences of our forefathers; neither take thou vengeance of our sins: Spare us, good Lord, spare thy people, whom thou hast redeemed with thy most precious blood, and be not angry with us for ever.
Spare us, good Lord.

FROM all evil and mischief; from sin; from the crafts and assaults of the devil; from thy wrath, and from everlasting damnation,
Good Lord, deliver us.
From all blindness of heart; from pride, vainglory, and hypocrisy; from envy, hatred, and malice, and all uncharitableness,
Good Lord, deliver us.
From all inordinate and sinful affections; and from all the deceits of the world, the flesh, and the devil,
Good Lord, deliver us.
From lightning and tempest; from earthquake, fire, and flood; from plague, pestilence, and famine; from battle and murder, and from sudden death,
Good Lord, deliver us.
From all sedition, privy conspiracy, and rebellion; from all false doctrine, heresy, and schism; from hardness of heart, and contempt of thy Word and Commandment,
Good Lord, deliver us.
By the mystery of thy holy Incarnation; by thy holy Nativity and Circumcision; by thy Baptism, Fasting, and Temptation,
Good Lord, deliver us.
By thine Agony and Bloody Sweat; by thy Cross and Passion; by thy precious Death and Burial; by thy glorious Resurrection and Ascension, and by the Coming of the Holy Ghost,
Good Lord, deliver us.
In all time of our tribulation; in all time of our prosperity; in the hour of death, and in the day of judgment,
Good Lord, deliver us.




WE sinners do beseech thee to hear us, O Lord God; and that it may please thee to rule and govern thy holy Church universal in the right way;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to bless N. our Pope, and N. our bishop,
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to illuminate all Bishops, Priests, and Deacons, with true knowledge and understanding of thy Word; and that both by their preaching and living they may set it forth, and show it accordingly;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to send forth labourers into thy harvest;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to bless and keep all thy people;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to give to all nations unity, peace, and concord;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to give us an heart to love and fear thee, and diligently to live after thy commandments;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to give to all thy people increase of grace to hear meekly thy Word, and to receive it with pure affection, and to bring forth the fruits of the Spirit;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to bring into the way of truth all such as have erred, and are deceived;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to strengthen such as do stand; and to comfort and help the weak-hearted; and to raise up those who fall; and finally to beat down Satan under our feet;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee so to rule the heart of thy servant, The President of the United States, that he may above all things seek thy honour and glory;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to bless and preserve all Christian Rulers and Magistrates, giving them grace to execute justice, and to maintain truth;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to succour, help, and comfort, all who are in danger, necessity, and tribulation;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to preserve all who travel by land, by water, or by air, all women in child-birth, all sick persons, and young children; and to show thy pity upon all prisoners and captives;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to defend, and provide for, the fatherless children, and widows, and all who are desolate and oppressed;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to have mercy upon all men;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to forgive our enemies, persecutors, and slanderers, and to turn their hearts;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to give and preserve to our use the kindly fruits of the earth, so that in due time we may enjoy them;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
That it may please thee to give us true repentance; to forgive us all our sins, negligences, and ignorances; and to endue us with the grace of thy Holy Spirit to amend our lives according to thy holy Word;
We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
Son of God, we beseech thee to hear us.
Son of God, we beseech thee to hear us.
O Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world;
Grant us thy peace.
O Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world;
Have mercy upon us.
O Christ, hear us.
O Christ, hear us.
Lord, have mercy upon us.
Lord, have mercy upon us.
Christ, have mercy upon us.
Christ, have mercy upon us.
Lord, have mercy upon us.
Lord, have mercy upon us.



¶ Then shall the Minister, and the People with him, say the Lord's Prayer.

OUR Father, who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, On earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, But deliver us from evil. Amen.

¶ The Minister may, at his discretion, omit all that followeth, to the Prayer, We humbly beseech thee, O Father, etc.

Minister.

O LORD, deal not with us according to our sins.
Neither reward us according to our iniquities.

Let us pray.

O GOD, merciful Father, who despisest not the sighing of a contrite heart, nor the desire of such as are sor-rowful; Mercifully assist our prayers which we make before thee in all our troubles and adversities, whensoever they oppress us; and graciously hear us, that those evils which the craft and subtilty of the devil or man worketh against us, may, by thy good providence, be brought to nought; that we thy servants, being hurt by no persecutions, may evermore give thanks unto thee in thy holy Church; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

¶ Minister and People.

O Lord, arise, help us, and deliver us for thy Name's sake.

Minister.

O GOD, we have heard with our ears, and our fathers have declared unto us, the noble works that thou didst in their days, and in the old time before them.

¶ Minister and People.

O Lord, arise, help us, and deliver us for thine honour.

Minister.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost;
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
From our enemies defend us, O Christ.
Graciously look upon our afflictions.
With pity behold the sorrows of our hearts.
Mercifully forgive the sins of thy people.
Favourably with mercy hear our prayers.
O Son of David, have mercy upon us.
Both now and ever vouchsafe to hear us, O Christ.
Graciously hear us, O Christ; graciously hear us, O Lord Christ.

O Lord, let thy mercy be showed upon us;
As we do put our trust in thee.

Let us pray.

WE humbly beseech thee, O Father, mercifully to look upon our infirmities; and, for the glory of thy Name, turn from us all those evils that we most justly have deserved; and grant, that in all our troubles we may put our whole trust and confidence in thy mercy, and evermore serve thee in holiness and pureness of living, to thy honour and glory; through our only Mediator and Advocate, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
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Restoration of the Sacred

Here is an excerpt from Rex Olandi Rex Cledendi:

The available evidence, when analysed, allows us to conclude that if a special presence of the Divine is to be found anywhere in man's historical world, it is to be found in its most concentrated form in a sacred ritual action, and because of their relationship to this sacred action, persons, places, times and objects are also called "sacred."

But what is an actio praecellenter sacra? It is simply the accomplishment of an action, a rite, performed by a community in a non-ordinary way. Let us be very precise: we are speaking here of the celebration of the Eucharistic mysteries during which there occurs the Exceptional par excellence, the uncommon and extraordinary in the absolute sense of those words - God's physical presence among men under the forms of bread and wine. The meaning of this divine Presence for man is precisely rapi - to be enraptured, carried up and away beyond the Here and Now. And nothing could be more obvious to a man of faith than to act "differently" within such a circumscribed context, "differently" than he acts otherwise, on the tennis courts, for instance, or at the supermarket. One speaks a language which is obviously human but yet "different;" "special," somehow, in delivery, in style, in diction and grammar, in vocabulary. What then of the musica sacra which forms an integral part of this actio praecellenter sacra? What must its distinctive characteristics be? Will it sound, for example, like ordinary, everyday pop music to which more or less "pious" texts have been joined? Will it sound like common, everyday entertainment music? like a more or less inconspicuous background accompaniment for toothpaste commercials? . . .

The Sacrament of the Eucharist is received and eaten because food and drink better symbolise the specific effects of the grace of this Sacrament. The Eucharist is both sacrifice (insofar as it is offered) and sacrament (insofar as it is received). The Church offers up the Mass, for it is a sacrifice; but Holy Communion is a food, a gift, a privilege, something not offered but enjoyed. The real distinction between Sacrifice and Sacrament is to be sought in the contrary aspects of suffering and joy, though in a sacrifice, suffering plays a different role than does joy in the case of a meal. Suffering is a necessary pre-condition of the sacrifice, whereas joy is a necessary consequence of a meal. To summarise: a meal as meal cannot be a sacrifice, and a sacrifice as sacrifice cannot be a meal. To represent one "in the form of" the other is to present a tragedy "in the form of" a comedy, or to depict a circle "in the form of" a square. In liturgico-musical terms: if Holy Mass is indeed a sacrifice, an actio praecellenter sacra, then one of its integral and necessary parts will be a music which is also sacra. But if a fraternal meal is actually being celebrated, then very different music will be appropriate . . . a "polka Mass," for instance.

During the ad limina visit of the Brazilian bishops of Pastoral region Sul-I, on 20 March 1990, Pope John Paul II made these significant remarks: Legitimate and necessary concern for current realities in the concrete lives of people cannot make us forget the true nature of the liturgical actions. It is clear that the Mass is not the time to "celebrate" human dignity or purely terrestrial claims or hopes. It is rather the sacrifice which renders Christ really present in the sacrament.

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Volunteer

Here is the problem: the site only gets about three visitors a day, and its hard to tell whether those folks are using the site or whether they happen upon this while browsing. I myself have gone back to using the Liturgy of the House in the four volume set. I'm not sure why I did that, but I think I honestly prefer it to the Book of Divine Worship. As such, publishing this site every week has become a chore. It also seems unecessary to me because the Book of Divine Worhsip is rather easy to use compared to other prayer books. If someone of the few people who use it would like to take over, I will more than happily hand over full administrator access to the blog. Otherwise, I'm going to discontinue putting up insturctions for the daily office. The blog will remain as a promotion for the Anglican-Use, and I will put updates and other intersting tid-bits; the daily office posts will not be updated.

I'm sorry if this causes problems for anyone. Again, if no one volunteers, the daily office will no longer be posted, but the blog will continue.
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Daily Office for the Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year Two

(All page numbers refer to The Book of Divine Worship.)

NB: It should be known that what follows is one form that this office can take. To discover the variety of possibilities, consult The Book of Divine Worship, pg 24-5, and pg 94-5, noting also that for each antiphon or collect given here others may lawfully be used according to the norms.

Readings, (pg. 51)

May 2

Morning Prayer: Rite 1

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg. 96
Penitential Rite, pg 100

For private and common prayer:
Invitatory, pg 101
Antiphon for Easter, pg 102 (said before the psalm, after each verse of the psalm, and before and after the Glory Be)
Venite (2), pg 104 followed by Glory Be
The Psalter: Psalm 9-11, Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 107
First reading, Exod. 28:1-4, 30-38
Following the reading, canticle 4 is said, pg 111
Reading from the Fathers of the Church below
The Apostles’ Creed, pg 114
The Prayers: pg, 115, the Our Father followed by the Suffrages A
The Collects: Collect for the Fourth Week of Easter, pg 393
The Prayer of Mission, pg 118
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 119
Conclusion, pg 120


Noonday Prayer, pg 150-154
For the Psalms, the Psalms proper to the day from the Daily Lectionary, given here, may be used. This makes for a longer noonday order, but preserves the unity of what is prescribed by the Lectionary.
Psalm 63, 98, and 103


Evening Prayer: Rite 1

It is fitting that Evening Prayer be said in an appropriate place, whether at a home or in a church, with a candle lit, a crucifix, and images of saints (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2691).

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg 155
Penitential Rite, pg 156

For private or common prayer:
Invitatory: pg 157
The Psalter: Psalm 12-14, Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 158
First Reading, 1 John 2:18-29
Following the first reading, canticle 1 is said, pg 108-9
Second Reading, Mark 6:30-44
Following the second reading, canticle 3 is said, pg 159
The Prayers: pg 161, the Our Father followed by Suffrages B, pg 116
The Collects: Collect for the Fourth Week of Easter, pg 393
The Prayer of Mission, 164
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 165
A prayer of St. John Chrysostom, pg 165
Conclusion, pg 166

Questions, comments? Email me.

A reading from the Fathers of the Church
These selections are taken largely from New Advent and Wisdom! Readings from the Fathers of the Church, and Universalis. I will sometimes use other sources as well.

From a homily on the Gospels by Saint Gregory the Great, pope

Christ the Good Shepherd

I am the good shepherd. I know my own - by which I mean, I love them - and my own know me. In plain words: those who love me are willing to follow me, for anyone who does not love the truth has not yet come to know it.
My dear brethren, you have heard the test we pastors have to undergo. Turn now to consider how these words of our Lord imply a test for yourselves also. Ask yourselves whether you belong to his flock, whether you know him, whether the light of his truth shines in your minds. I assure you that it is not by faith that you will come to know him, but by love; not by mere conviction, but by action. John the evangelist is my authority for this statement. He tells us that anyone who claims to know God without keeping his commandments is a liar.
Consequently, the Lord immediately adds: As the Father knows me and I know the Father; and I lay down my life for my sheep. Clearly he means that laying down his life for his sheep gives evidence of his knowledge of the Father and the Father’s knowledge of him. In other words, by the love with which he dies for his sheep he shows how greatly he loves his Father.
Again he says: My sheep hear my voice, and I know them; they follow me, and I give them eternal life. Shortly before this he had declared: If anyone enters the sheepfold through me he shall be saved; he shall go freely in and out and shall find good pasture. He will enter into a life of faith; from faith he will go out to vision, from belief to contemplation, and will graze in the good pastures of everlasting life.
So our Lord’s sheep will finally reach their grazing ground where all who follow him in simplicity of heart will feed on the green pastures of eternity. These pastures are the spiritual joys of heaven. There the elect look upon the face of God with unclouded vision and feast at the banquet of life for ever more.
Beloved brothers, let us set out for these pastures where we shall keep joyful festival with so many of our fellow citizens. May the thought of their happiness urge us on! Let us stir up our hearts, rekindle our faith, and long eagerly for what heaven has in store for us. To love thus is to be already on our way. No matter what obstacles we encounter, we must not allow them to turn us aside from the joy of that heavenly feast. Anyone who is determined to reach his destination is not deterred by the roughness of the road that leads to it. Nor must we allow the charm of success to seduce us, or we shall be like a foolish traveller who is so distracted by the pleasant meadows through which he is passing that he forgets where he is going.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

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Daily Office for Saturday of the Third Week of Easter, Year Two

(All page numbers refer to The Book of Divine Worship.)

NB: It should be known that what follows is one form that this office can take. To discover the variety of possibilities, consult The Book of Divine Worship, pg 24-5, and pg 94-5, noting also that for each antiphon or collect given here others may lawfully be used according to the norms.

Readings, (pg. 51)

May 1

Morning Prayer: Rite 1

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg. 96
Penitential Rite, pg 100

For private and common prayer:
Invitatory, pg 101
Antiphon for Easter, pg 102 (said before the psalm, after each verse of the psalm, and before and after the Glory Be)
Venite (2), pg 104 followed by Glory Be
The Psalter: Psalm 1-5, Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 107
First reading, Exodus 25:1-22
Following the reading, canticle 4 is said, pg 111
Reading from the Fathers of the Church below
The Apostles’ Creed, pg 114
The Prayers: pg, 115, the Our Father followed by the Suffrages A
The Collects: Collect for the Third Week of Easter, pg 392
The Prayer of Mission, pg 118
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 119
Conclusion, pg 120


Noonday Prayer, pg 150-154
For the Psalms, the Psalms proper to the day from the Daily Lectionary, given here, may be used. This makes for a longer noonday order, but preserves the unity of what is prescribed by the Lectionary.
Psalm 30, 32, 42, and 43


Evening Prayer: Rite 1

It is fitting that Evening Prayer be said in an appropriate place, whether at a home or in a church, with a candle lit, a crucifix, and images of saints (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2691).

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg 155
Penitential Rite, pg 156

For private or common prayer:
Invitatory: pg 157
The Psalter: Psalm 6-8, Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 158
First Reading, Colossians 3:1-17
Following the first reading, canticle 7 is said, pg 113
Second Reading, Matthew 4:18-25
Following the second reading, canticle 3 is said, pg 159
The Prayers: pg 161, the Our Father followed by Suffrages B, pg 116
The Collects: Collect for the Third Week of Easter, pg 392
The Prayer of Mission, 164
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 165
A prayer of St. John Chrysostom, pg 165
Conclusion, pg 166

Questions, comments? Email me.

A reading from the Fathers of the Church
These selections are taken largely from New Advent and Wisdom! Readings from the Fathers of the Church, and Universalis. I will sometimes use other sources as well.

From a commentary on the gospel of John by Saint Cyril of Alexandria

Christ gave his own body for the life of all men

“I am dying for all men”, says the Lord. “I am dying to give them life through myself and to redeem the whole human race through my humanity. In my death, death itself will die and man’s fallen nature will rise again with me. I wanted to be like my brothers in every respect, so I became a man like you, a descendant of Abraham”. Understanding this well Saint Paul says: As the children of a family share the same flesh and blood, he too shared our human nature so that by his death he could destroy the power of the devil, the prince of death. Death itself and the prince of death could be destroyed only by Christ, who is above all, giving himself up as a ransom for all.
And so, speaking as a spotless victim offering himself for us to God the Father, Christ says in one of the psalms: You desired no sacrifices or offerings, but you have prepared a body for me. You took no pleasure in holocausts or sin offerings. Then I said, “Behold, I am coming”. He was crucified for all, desiring his one death for all to give all of us life in him. It was impossible for him to be conquered by death; nor could he who by his very nature is life be subject to corruption. Yet we know that Christ offered his flesh for the life of the world from his own prayer, Holy Father, protect them, and from his words, For their sake I consecrate myself. By saying that he consecrates himself he means that he offers himself to God as a spotless and sweet-smelling sacrifice. According to the law, anything offered upon the altar was consecrated and considered holy. So Christ gave his own body for the life of all, and makes it the channel through which life flows once more into us. How he does this I will explain to the best of my ability.
When the life-giving Word of God dwelt in human flesh, he changed it into that good thing which is distinctively his, namely, life; and by being wholly united to the flesh in a a way beyond our comprehension, he gave it the life-giving power which he has by his very nature. Therefore, the body of Christ gives life to those who receive it. Its presence in mortal men expels death and drives away corruption because it contains within itself in his entirety the Word who totally abolishes corruption.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

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Daily Office for Friday of the Third Week of Easter, Year Two

(All page numbers refer to The Book of Divine Worship.)

NB: It should be known that what follows is one form that this office can take. To discover the variety of possibilities, consult The Book of Divine Worship, pg 24-5, and pg 94-5, noting also that for each antiphon or collect given here others may lawfully be used according to the norms.

Readings, (pg. 51)

April 30th,

Morning Prayer: Rite 1

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg. 96
Penitential Rite, pg 100

For private and common prayer:
Invitatory, pg 101
Antiphon for Easter, pg 102 (said before the psalm, after each verse of the psalm, and before and after the Glory Be)
Venite (2), pg 104 followed by Glory Be
The Psalter: Psalm 144-146, Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 107
First reading, Exodus 24:1-18
Following the reading, canticle 4 is said, pg 111
Reading from the Fathers of the Church below
The Apostles’ Creed, pg 114
The Prayers: pg, 115, the Our Father followed by the Suffrages A
The Collects: Collect for the Third Week of Easter, pg 392
The Prayer of Mission, pg 118
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 119
Conclusion, pg 120


Noonday Prayer, pg 150-154
For the Psalms, the Psalms proper to the day from the Daily Lectionary, given here, may be used. This makes for a longer noonday order, but preserves the unity of what is prescribed by the Lectionary.
Psalm 105


Evening Prayer: Rite 1

It is fitting that Evening Prayer be said in an appropriate place, whether at a home or in a church, with a candle lit, a crucifix, and images of saints (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2691).

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg 155
Penitential Rite, pg 156

For private or common prayer:
Invitatory: pg 157
The Psalter: Psalm 147-150, Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 158
First Reading, Colossians 2:8-23
Following the first reading, canticle 19 is said, pg 140
Second Reading, Matthew 4:12-17
Following the second reading, canticle 3 is said, pg 159
The Prayers: pg 161, the Our Father followed by Suffrages B, pg 116
The Collects: Collect for the Third Week of Easter, pg 392
The Prayer of Mission, 164
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 165
A prayer of St. John Chrysostom, pg 165
Conclusion, pg 166

Questions, comments? Email me.

A reading from the Fathers of the Church
These selections are taken largely from New Advent and Wisdom! Readings from the Fathers of the Church, and Universalis. I will sometimes use other sources as well.

From a sermon by Saint Ephrem, deacon

The cross of Christ gives life to the human race

Death trampled our Lord underfoot, but he in his turn treated death as a highroad for his own feet. He submitted to it, enduring it willingly, because by this means he would be able to destroy death in spite of itself. Death had its own way when our Lord went out from Jerusalem carrying his cross; but when by a loud cry from that cross he summoned the dead from the underworld, death was powerless to prevent it.
Death slew him by means of the body which he had assumed, but that same body proved to be the weapon with which he conquered death. Concealed beneath the cloak of his manhood, his godhead engaged death in combat; but in slaying our Lord, death itself was slain. It was able to kill natural human life, but was itself killed by the life that is above the nature of man.
Death could not devour our Lord unless he possessed a body, neither could hell swallow him up unless he bore our flesh; and so he came in search of a chariot in which to ride to the underworld. This chariot was the body which he received from the Virgin; in it he invaded death’s fortress, broke open its strong-room and scattered all its treasure.
At length he came upon Eve, the mother of all the living. She was that vineyard whose enclosure her own hands had enabled death to violate, so that she could taste its fruit; thus the mother of all the living became the source of death for every living creature. But in her stead Mary grew up, a new vine in place of the old. Christ, the new life, dwelt within her. When death, with its customary impudence, came foraging for her mortal fruit, it encountered its own destruction in the hidden life that fruit contained. All unsuspecting, it swallowed him up, and in so doing released life itself and set free a multitude of men.
He who was also the carpenter’s glorious son set up his cross above death’s all-consuming jaws, and led the human race into the dwelling place of life. Since a tree had brought about the downfall of mankind, it was upon a tree that mankind crossed over to the realm of life. Bitter was the branch that had once been grafted upon that ancient tree, but sweet the young shoot that has now been grafted in, the shoot in which we are meant to recognise the Lord whom no creature can resist.
We give glory to you, Lord, who raised up your cross to span the jaws of death like a bridge by which souls might pass from the region of the dead to the land of the living. We give glory to you who put on the body of a single mortal man and made it the source of life for every other mortal man. You are incontestably alive. Your murderers sowed your living body in the earth as farmers sow grain, but it sprang up and yielded an abundant harvest of men raised from the dead.
Come then, my brothers and sisters, let us offer our Lord the great and all-embracing sacrifice of our love, pouring out our treasury of hymns and prayers before him who offered his cross in sacrifice to God for the enrichment of us all

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

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Daily Office for Thursday of the Third Week of Easter, Year Two

(All page numbers refer to The Book of Divine Worship.)

NB: It should be known that what follows is one form that this office can take. To discover the variety of possibilities, consult The Book of Divine Worship, pg 24-5, and pg 94-5, noting also that for each antiphon or collect given here others may lawfully be used according to the norms.

Readings, (pg. 51)

April 29th, Catherine of Sienna

Morning Prayer: Rite 1

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg. 96
Penitential Rite, pg 100

For private and common prayer:
Invitatory, pg 101
Antiphon for Easter, pg 102 (said before the psalm, after each verse of the psalm, and before and after the Glory Be)
Venite (2), pg 104 followed by Glory Be
The Psalter: Psalm 139-140, Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 107
First reading, Exodus 20:1-21
Following the reading, canticle 4 is said, pg 111
Reading from the Fathers of the Church below
The Apostles’ Creed, pg 114
The Prayers: pg, 115, the Our Father followed by the Suffrages A
The Collects: Collect for the Third Week of Easter, pg 392
The Prayer of Mission, pg 118
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 119
Conclusion, pg 120


Noonday Prayer, pg 150-154
For the Psalms, the Psalms proper to the day from the Daily Lectionary, given here, may be used. This makes for a longer noonday order, but preserves the unity of what is prescribed by the Lectionary.
Psalm 37


Evening Prayer: Rite 1

It is fitting that Evening Prayer be said in an appropriate place, whether at a home or in a church, with a candle lit, a crucifix, and images of saints (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2691).

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg 155
Penitential Rite, pg 156

For private or common prayer:
Invitatory: pg 157
The Psalter: Psalm 141-143, Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 158
First Reading, Colossians 1:24-2:7
Following the first reading, canticle 18 is said, pg 139
Second Reading, Matthew 4:1-11
Following the second reading, canticle 3 is said, pg 159
The Prayers: pg 161, the Our Father followed by Suffrages B, pg 116
The Collects: Collect for the Third Week of Easter, pg 392
The Prayer of Mission, 164
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 165
A prayer of St. John Chrysostom, pg 165
Conclusion, pg 166

Questions, comments? Email me.

A reading from the Fathers of the Church
These selections are taken largely from New Advent and Wisdom! Readings from the Fathers of the Church, and Universalis. I will sometimes use other sources as well.

From the dialogue On Divine Providence by Saint Catherine of Siena, virgin and doctor

I tasted and I saw

Eternal God, eternal Trinity, you have made the blood of Christ so precious through his sharing in your divine nature. You are a mystery as deep as the sea; the more I search, the more I find, and the more I find the more I search for you. But I can never be satisfied; what I receive will ever leave me desiring more. When you fill my soul I have an even greater hunger, and I grow more famished for your light. I desire above all to see you, the true light, as you really are.
I have tasted and seen the depth of your mystery and the beauty of your creation with the light of my understanding. I have clothed myself with your likeness and have seen what I shall be. Eternal Father, you have given me a share in your power and the wisdom that Christ claims as his own, and your Holy Spirit has given me the desire to love you. You are my Creator, eternal Trinity, and I am your creature. You have made of me a new creation in the blood of your Son, and I know that you are moved with love at the beauty of your creation, for you have enlightened me.
Eternal Trinity, Godhead, mystery deep as the sea, you could give me no greater gift than the gift of yourself. For you are a fire ever burning and never consumed, which itself consumes all the selfish love that fills my being. Yes, you are a fire that takes away the coldness, illuminates the mind with its light and causes me to know your truth. By this light, reflected as it were in a mirror, I recognise that you are the highest good, one we can neither comprehend nor fathom. And I know that you are beauty and wisdom itself. The food of angels, you gave yourself to man in the fire of your love.
You are the garment which covers our nakedness, and in our hunger you are a satisfying food, for you are sweetness and in you there is no taste of bitterness, O triune God!

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

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Daily Office for Wednesday of the Third Week of Easter, Year Two

(All page numbers refer to The Book of Divine Worship.)

NB: It should be known that what follows is one form that this office can take. To discover the variety of possibilities, consult The Book of Divine Worship, pg 24-5, and pg 94-5, noting also that for each antiphon or collect given here others may lawfully be used according to the norms.

Readings, (pg. 51)

April 28th

Morning Prayer: Rite 1

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg. 96
Penitential Rite, pg 100

For private and common prayer:
Invitatory, pg 101
Antiphon for Easter, pg 102 (said before the psalm, after each verse of the psalm, and before and after the Glory Be)
Venite (2), pg 104 followed by Glory Be
The Psalter: pg 742-745 (Psalm 132-135), Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 107
First reading, Exodus 19:16-25
Following the reading, canticle 4 is said, pg 111
The Apostles’ Creed, pg 114
The Prayers: pg, 115, the Our Father followed by the Suffrages A
The Collects: Collect for the Third Week of Easter, pg 392
The Prayer of Mission, pg 118
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 119
Conclusion, pg 120


Noonday Prayer, pg 150-154
For the Psalms, the Psalms proper to the day from the Daily Lectionary, given here, may be used. This makes for a longer noonday order, but preserves the unity of what is prescribed by the Lectionary.
Psalm 38 (pg 636-637), Psalm 119:25-48 (pg 727-729)


Evening Prayer: Rite 1

It is fitting that Evening Prayer be said in an appropriate place, whether at a home or in a church, with a candle lit, a crucifix, and images of saints (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2691).

For prayer in common:
Select Sentence of Scripture, pg 155
Penitential Rite, pg 156

For private or common prayer:
Invitatory: pg 157
The Psalter: pg 745-747 (Psalm 136-138), Glory Be following each psalm
The Lessons, pg 158
First Reading, Colossians 1:15-25
Following the first reading, canticle 14 is said, pg 137-8
Second Reading, Matthew 3:13-17
Following the second reading, canticle 3 is said, pg 159
The Prayers: pg 161, the Our Father followed by Suffrages B, pg 116
The Collects: Collect for the Third Week of Easter, pg 392
The Prayer of Mission, 164
Free Intercessions
The General Thanksgiving, pg 165
A prayer of St. John Chrysostom, pg 165
Conclusion, pg 166

Questions, comments? Email me.

A reading from the Fathers of the Church
These selections are taken largely from New Advent and Wisdom! Readings from the Fathers of the Church, and Universalis. I will sometimes use other sources as well.

From the first apology in defence of the Christians by Saint Justin, martyr

Baptismal regeneration

Through Christ we received new life and we consecrated ourselves to God. I will explain the way in which we did this. Those who believe what we teach is true and who give assurance of their ability to live according to that teaching are taught to ask God’s forgiveness for their sins by prayer and fasting and we pray and fast with them. We then lead them to a place where there is water and they are reborn in the same way as we were reborn; that is to say, they are washed in the water in the name of God, the Father and Lord of the whole universe, of our Saviour Jesus Christ and of the Holy Spirit. This is done because Christ said: Unless you are born again you will not enter the kingdom of heaven, and it is impossible for anyone, having once been born, to re-enter his mother’s womb.
An explanation of how repentant sinners are to be freed from their sins is given through the prophet Isaiah in the words: Wash yourselves and be clean. Remove the evil from your souls; learn to do what is right. Be just to the orphan, vindicate the widow. Come, let us reason together, says the Lord. If your sins are like scarlet, I will make them white as wool; if they are like crimson, I will make them white as snow. But if you do not heed me, you shall be devoured by the sword. The mouth of the Lord has spoken.
The apostles taught us the reason for this ceremony of ours. Our first birth took place without our knowledge or consent because our parents came together, and we grew up in the midst of wickedness. So if we were not to remain children of necessity and ignorance, we needed a new birth of which we ourselves would be conscious, and which would be the result of our own free choice. We needed, too, to have our sins forgiven. This is why the name of God, the Father and Lord of the whole universe, is pronounced in the water over anyone who chooses to be born again and who has repented of his sins. The person who leads the candidate for baptism to the font calls upon God by this name alone, for God so far surpasses our powers of description that no one can really give a name to him. Anyone who dares to say that he can must be hopelessly insane.
This baptism is called “illumination” because of the mental enlightenment that is experienced by those who learn these things. The person receiving this enlightenment is also baptised in the name of Jesus Christ, who was crucified under Pontius Pilate, and in the name of the Holy Spirit, who through the prophets foretold everything concerning Jesus.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

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EWTN Liturgy Library

Here are a over 244 documents on the liturgy, everything from stuff on the Jubilee, to the use of extraordinary ministers of the Eucharist.

EWTN Liturgy Library via Rex Olandi.
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